No thanks. Disappointing, because from that description it sounds magnificent, sans-crucifix.If you know of the location of any catacomb saints, please contact me through the blog or via my Instagram account (@lost.lara).

The photography is stunning and displays the best examples of this demonstration of faith that have survived. The skeletons were often lavishly decorated with gold costumes to simulate early martyrs. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! I was fortunate enough to attend a lecture and book signing by Dr. Koudounaris - and was it ever entertaining and lively! The history of these relics is described from their discovery through to their ultimate contemporary fate and is a fascinating and moving story of faith and reverence. Gallus and Ulrich is home to two catacomb saint who are wrapped in a distinctive pattern of buratto lace, which is not seen elsewhere. THE ORIGINAL SPOOKY AND SPARKLY.<3THIS IS EVERYTHING. I liked the author's previous book Empire of Death, but in some ways I liked this one more. Image taken at an exhibition at the Historical Museum St. Gallen in Wil, Switzerland. I enjoyed Dr Koustounis’ last book ‘Th e Empire of Death’ which was about ossuaries and charnel houses and this is even better. Like the first book, Empire of the Dead, Heavenly Bodies is full of stunning photographs for this unique and unknown to me practice of decorated skeletal relics. Highly recommended for the historically interested with a taste for the macabre.Stunning photographs of some of the most beautiful jewel and textile art I've ever seen, the fact it graces the remains of so called saints makes it all the more fascinating to look at. This records the history and significance of the myriad catacomb saints that flooded into the German speaking world during the Counter Reformation. The text, however, is the reason I'll keep it. Try the new Google Books. Like the first book, Empire of the Dead, Heavenly Bodies is full of stunning photographs for this unique and unknown to me practice of decorated skeletal relics. Koudounaris explores the trade in skeletal remains believed to be those of early Christian saints in post-Reformation Europe. The following are the details of the churches I visited in order of the number of skeletons I was able to see/photograph – not in the chronological order that I visited them.Waldsassen is the OG of Catacomb Saints. Russia's catacomb saints : …

Skeletons of these supposed saints were subsequently sent to Catholic churches and religious houses in German-speaking Europe to replace holy relics that had been destroyed in the wake of the Protestant Reformation. If you have visited any of the (in)famous catacombs in and around Rome, you may have noticed that unlike the Catacombs of Paris, they are noticeably devoid of any human remains. Lapsed Catholic that I am, I still love me some weird saintly tales and gruesome relics. But the thing that I really liked about it more was just the text, which I thought was very well written, very readable, and very empathic, especially in the last chapter. by Thames Hudson

Try it now.

You can't see me, but I'm hugging it. Although the true identities of these bones will never be known, they were for a while considered emissaries of God: posed, displayed, dressed in jewels. Paul Koudounaris is an author and photographer from Los Angeles. THE ORIGINAL SPOOKY AND SPARKLY.<3This is a very interesting, though somewhat bizarre, book.This is a very interesting, though somewhat bizarre, book.I wound up getting a copy of this in UK before it was released in the USA--it since to have come out in Europe a month earlier.

Heavenly Bodies toes the line between coffee-table book and pop-history tome. I am simply amazed by the craftsmanship of these decorated skeletons and glad to see that they have an attentive audience once again.A beautifully illustrated book on a very interesting topic. Interesting in terms of the events that occurred, but not necessarily gripping writing.

The accompanying photographs of the saintly decorated skeletons that have survived to the modern day are wonderful, as text alone couldn't begin to describe them.this was such a cool book. To create our lis...Death has never looked so beautiful. I enjoyed Dr Koustounis’ last book ‘Th e Empire of Death’ which was about ossuaries and charnel houses and this is even better.

The skeletons, known as the catacomb saints, were carefully reassembled, richly dressed in fantastic costumes, wigs, crowns, jewels, and armor, and posed in elaborate displays inside churches and shrines as reminders to the faithful of the heavenly treasures that awaited them after death. If you have visited any of the (in)famous catacombs in and around Rome, you may have noticed that unlike the In the first half of 2019, I spent a week with my DSLR and a rental car attempting to see as many of these Catacomb Saints as I was able. NB: This post, and the road trip that I took, were entirely inspired by Paul Koudounaris’ book Heavenly Bodies: Cult Treasure and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs (2013, Thames & Hudson).. In 1803, the secular magistrate of Rottenbuch in Bavaria auctioned the town's two saints. "Heavenly Bodies: Cult Treasures & Spectacular Saints from the CatacombsI loved this book. by Ivan Michajlovič Andreev, Religionsphilosoph Russland USA; Seraphim Rose Print book: English. Much of the book is made up of the most exquisite yet macabre photographs taken by Koudounaris around Central Europe, showing off the rich splendor of the Catholic church. Russia's catacomb saints : lives of the new martyrs: 1. The New Martyr Lydia AND THE SOLDIERS CYRIL AND ALEXEI: 21.