My piano teacher and I discussed pieces appropriate in demonstrating a robust technique, expressive capablitites etc. Just because you learn one piece faster than the other doesn't necessarily mean it's easier than the other piece.
13, is seen as one of the composer's greatest emotional achievements.Mournful, stately, and beautiful - in just over six minutes of breathtaking music, Chopin explores the emotional ranges of the piano.

My question is, how hard is this Nocturne compared to some of Chopin's Etudes and other major works? With the shorter sustain of Chopin's piano this would have been a lot easier. This Nocturne (and nocturnes in general) is (are) powerful, because it gives the pianist the ability to REALLY grab the audience members' souls and cause them to fall into an almost trance... if played well. 1 are probably easier.

Did I mention that this is a black-belt piece?. midi genres/directions. Tackling a piece is not the same as pulling off a convincing performance in front of an audience, or examiners for a music degree for that matter.

Is it as hard as any of these, and if so, which ones is it comparable to in difficulty? if you can keep relaxed, the leaps shouldn't be nearly as bad as playing any form of octaves while having to sustain a melodic line in between them (as in the octave etude).Hi, nanabush!

Andantino in F♯ minor

Nocturnes (Chopin, Frédéric) Movements/Sections Mov'ts/Sec's: ... Op.37 No.2 • Nocturne No.13 in C minor, Op.48 No.1 • Nocturne No.14 in F♯ minor, Op.48 No.2 • Nocturne No.15 in F minor, Op.55 No.1 • Nocturne No.16 in E♭ major, Op.55 No.2 • Nocturne No.17 in B major, Op.62 No.1 • Nocturne No…

advertisement. By some standards, I have to wonder if 48/1 should even be regarded as playable.

It is pretty much the hardest of Chopin’s nocturnes.

One thing I notice, having studied both 48/1 and 25/10, is that the octaves in 25/10 are not so hard as those in 48/1, even though 25/10 has way more of them. I think it is the greatest Nocturne written by Chopin..the most difficult part of this nocturne is the end with the repeated chords. I hadn't thought about that, but for some reason, they never gave me any trouble, so I wasn't thinking about them! I mean, the doppio movimento would seem to need the eighth notes going at 360 per minute, just like 25/10's fast parts. Lento in C minor 2. 13, is seen as one of the composer's greatest emotional achievements. 1 and grabbing people's souls (like it's meant to do) is a different story. The work was composed in 1841 alone with his Nocturne in F sharp minor, and dedicated to one of the composer's favourite pupils, Laure Duperré. I can assure you this piece is more difficult than many think. Are you up for a new challenge?. Mournful, stately, and beautiful - in just over six minutes of breathtaking music, Chopin explores the emotional ranges of the piano.

It's very difficult to guage the sonority, light repeated  chords with the cantilena above it in a forte context.

Sorry to necro this thread, but since I restarted my work on this piece (which inevitably brought me back to this rather productive discussion) I was curious to see how the others in the thread who were working through this were doing?

The Octave part sounds hard but I don't think it is as hard as it sounds, and the doppio movimento is supposed to be extremely hard, but doesn't sound that hard in my opinion.

As if that weren't nightmarish enough, they have to be played with the melody part of them louder than the harmonization, and the whole has to be part of a long crescendo. The time Hugh Grant starred as Chopin in a delightfullyA pianist’s grand piano broke on stage, and she dealtThis pianist can text, play chess and lift weights at theChopin’s face is brought to life in artist’s incredibleChopin: Compositions, pronunciation, biography and otherNew Releases: Bach with Zhu Xiao-Mei and Emmanuel DespaxNew Releases: Richard Harvey's Kyrie and The Four Seasons11-year-old kid plays Chopin’s Fantaisie-Impromptu fromIf Rachmaninov and Chopin were friends… their music would93-year-old man gets burgled, policeman visits and plays Sure you can go ahead and compare this nocturne to each and every etude one by one and decide which is more difficult to simply memorize or play the right notes to, but playing Op.

I started on the doppio movimento, of course, as this is the most difficult. Franz Schubert Re: Chopin nocturne op 48 no 1 «Reply #32 on: February 05, 2015, 01:18:01 PM » I only listened to the first and last links you posted, and I like the last link. Today’s video tutorial is dedicated to a black-belt advanced piece: the amazing Nocturne in C Minor, op. They are the only two nocturnes in opus 48 and are dedicated to …

1 requires the pianist to play with lots of feeling and emotion - the pianist needs to LIVE the piece, not simply play the notes, in order for it to sound right. But there is a sixteenth-note septuplet of chords in the doppio movimento;  to be absolutely consistent about the tempo would seem to require that they be played at 840 per minute. Also op.37 no.1 and op.72 no.

I guess there are a few etudes that aren't as difficult as that nocturne, though.It's one Chopin piece which is harder to bring off convincingly on a modern piano than it would have been on Chopin's.

The octaves in 48/1 just involve harder leaps. There are indeed those melodic lines in the octaves etude!

Do not be tempted to play it any faster than you can comfortably play it at any given point in the practice process.
This was one of the pieces I played in my final recital for my music degree at London University over thirty years ago. I have heard many people saying Chopin's Nocturne Op 48 no 1 in C minor is a very hard piece, but is it really that hard? I have heard many people saying Chopin's Nocturne Op 48 no 1 in C minor is a very hard piece, but is it really that hard?