Post World War II, interest in South Pacific culture exploded in the cocktail world, fueling the Tiki boom of the mid-century. By submitting this form, you confirm you have read and agreed to the data protection information in the Privacy Policy section To be able to use 31DOVER in full range, we recommend activating Javascript in your browser. It was a Victorian idea to mix hard liquor with soft drink and fruit, which evolved over time to include herbs & spices, honey, milk and sugar. The first known printed use of the word “cocktail” was in 1803 in an article in the Farmer's Cabinet (Amherst, New Hampshire, April 28, 1803). The cosmopolitan is a relative of cranberry coolers like the Cape Codder. The best known and most enduring American bar in London was (and still is) at The Savoy. Image courtesy of US National Archives, Still Pictures Section.Cocktails became less-and-less popular through the 1960s and early 1970s, yet started to make a comeback in the mid-late 1970s. Punch, also popular amongst the British Navy by the end of the 17th Century, was a concoction of five ingredients (Panch means “five” in Hindi) – including liquor, citrus juice, tea (or other spice), water and sugar.Illustration of Royal Navy grog rations being served on board ship. One may even be the truth. Grog was served by the British Navy well into the 20th Century. Mocktails are any mixed drinks that don’t contain alcohol. Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Venice's beloved Harry's Bar, … There is almost a mythology associated with mixology, the art of mixing drinks, and the very origin of such concoctions can, without firm evidence, be the stuff of legend. There are numerous tall tales that explore the meaning of “cocktail” and how it came to refer to a drink. Punch, also popular amongst the British Navy by the end of the 17th Century, was a concoction of five ingredients (Panch means “five” in Hindi) – including liquor, citrus juice, tea (or other spice), water and sugar.Image courtesy of Australian National Maritime Museum.The origin of the term cocktail is disputed. and intriguing history when it comes to cocktails, from fermenting jars of honey and spiced concoctions, to cock & bull tales and Cock Ales in 16th Century Britain. The first published definition of a cocktail appeared in an editorial response in The Balance and Columbian Repository of 1806. There is almost a mythology associated with mixology, the art of mixing drinks, and the very origin of such concoctions can, without firm evidence, be the stuff of legend. The British Navy encouraged their sailors to drink grog in the 17th century, which was a mixture of rum and water, as a way of getting sailors to drink water. There is a surprisingly long, hazy (well we are talking cocktails here!) A brief look into the history of cocktails over the years.Are you a purist; scientifically measuring and decanting, carefully studying the recipe? As old newspapers, etc. Grog was served by the British Navy well into the 20th Century.

The brandy of the day was generally sweetened, which puts us perilously close to the definition of the cocktail and maybe, just maybe makes Dr. Stoughton the inventor of the cocktail recipe… Maybe.If, after that mammoth history lesson, you're still feeling inspired, take a look at some of the below. But also a lot of history. Although there were times in the 1900’s when cocktails were not so popular (during the World Wars for example), cocktails became very popular again in the late 70’s and early 80’s. A Cocktailis mixed either as one type of alcohol with juices, as a soft drink and other fruits or as multiple alcoholic drinks with juices or ice tea. In amongst the numerous recipes for mixed Punches, Sours, Slings, Cobblers, and Toddies, there were 10 recipes for drinks referred to as “Cocktails”. and intriguing history when it comes to cocktails, from fermenting jars of honey and spiced concoctions, to cock & bull tales and Cock Ales in 16th Century Britain. The British Navy encouraged their sailors to drink grog in the 17th century, which was a mixture of rum and water, as a way of getting sailors to drink water. People have been mixing drinks for centuries, often to make an ingredient more palatable or to create medicinal elixirs.