Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. For example, different technical solutions were required to build roads in marshy areas or in areas where the road passed through a bedrock. The Roman roads were a truly amazing piece of engineering, acting as a poignant and enduring legacy for the engineers who designed these marvels. The road was later extended to the Adriatic coast, to Brundisium (today Brindisi). The road network was important in maintaining the stability of the empire and its expansion. In 145 bce they began the Via Egnatia, an extension of the Via … The Romans built roads through the forests that covered the historic county, including what are now Watling Street and Ryknield Street, intersecting near Lichfield.


Roads were built by the Roman government and would take the name of the censor who built them. Get kids back-to-school ready with Expedition: Learn! Roman road construction involved colossal works of engineering due to the roads' length which required massive land excavation and the transport of materials over long distances, and because bridges, tunnels and viaducts had to be built wherever roads encountered major topographical obstacles. They left behind them many bridges, canals, stone-paved roads and other engineering masterpieces all throughout the Roman Empire. The other road was Via Popilia, which stretched across Calabria to the Strait of Messina.The ancient Roman roads connected cities and provinces. Roads Roman Roads were important to the economy and the military of the Romans. Every 3-5 meters there was a higher block set into the curb. A Roman road was a … History at your fingertips The core of the agger would be covered with a layer of larger stones, if available, with the upper surface being formed from layers of … Roman road consists of three layers: A bottom foundation layer, often of stone ; A middle layer of softer material such as sand or gravel ; A surface, or "metalling," usually a gravel, but sometimes paving stones. The roads were used for transport from one location to another. Many ancient Roman roads also passed through Croatian territory, and some of them coincide with contemporary routes. The block would allow people to stop, mount horses or load animals into carriages.The oldest ancient Roman road was Via Appia, a 261 km long road that stretched southeast from Rome all the way to Tarentum (today Taranto). Roman settlements developed along those roads, including Letocetum (near Wall; at their intersection) and Pennocrucium (near Penkridge). However, the … The vast Roman Empire boasted a very large and extensive network of roads. The structure of Roman roads varied greatly, but a typical form was an agger, or bank, forming the road’s core, built of layers of stone or gravel (depending on what was available locally). The ancient Romans were famous builders. Along the roads it was permitted to walk, pass through, drive cattle and wheeled vehicles, or to engage in traffic of any kind.The ancient Roman roads were primarily built by the legionnaires themselves. Where possible, roads were built in the straightest line possible, only avoiding major terrain obstacles where it made practical sense. The Roman Surveyors . It is estimated that the roads in the network were more than 400,000 km long and that over 80,500 km out of those were stone-paved. There is no single standard construction for Roman roads but there are some rules. Though adapting their technique to materials locally available, the Roman engineers followed basically the same principles in building abroad as they had in Italy. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica.Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Without them, the ancient Romans would never have been able to conquer and hold on to such a vast territory over several centuries – at the height of the Roman expansion, the Roman Empire covered an area of 4.400.000 km².Although the network of Roman roads gradually disappeared after the fall of the Roman Empire, it became the basis for hundreds of contemporary infrastructural corridors throughout Europe and the Middle East. Construction of the paved Via terrena was complex and involved constructing a layered foundation to support the paved surface. The Romans drew their expertise mainly from the Etruscans—particularly in cement technology and street paving—though… They left behind them many bridges, canals, stone-paved roads and other engineering masterpieces all throughout the Roman Empire. They were also …


They were built using many layers of masonry including concrete. Roman Road Construction. It is estimated that the roads in the network were more than 400,000 km …

The Roman roads were notable for their straightness, solid foundations, cambered surfaces facilitating drainage, and use of concrete made from pozzolana (volcanic ash) and lime. The greatest systematic road builders of the ancient world were the Romans, who were very conscious of the military, economic, and administrative advantages of a good road system. Ancient Roman roads – a monument to history and road construction. Roman roads are famed for being incredibly straight. Most of the stone-built infrastructure in the Principate in the Roman Empire in some way, shape, or form, especially public buildings and fortifications, would in some way, shape, or form have the inclusion of the Roman military in their construction.

From the 7th until the… In areas of soft ground the road might be built over timber piles and layers of brushwood. The roads are only one example. They allowed for easier commerce between towns and cities and also allowed the Roman Legions to move quickly around the expanding empire. Get exclusive access to content from our 1768 First Edition with your subscription.