Please try againSorry, we failed to record your vote. There was an error retrieving your Wish Lists. I'm still a student and it would be a great help if somebody can provide me a soft copy of this book?Toyota Kata: Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior ResultsFollowers of the blog might recall an early new year resolution to get more value from I read. Read Part IV (Coaching Kata), then Part III (Target Condition). What I find particularly interesting is the view that an organization’s processes and practices are an This is a very interesting book! […] Any organized process naturally tends to decline to a chaotic state if we leave it alone. I think I've been doing it wrong. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of Book description: "Toyota Katagets to the essence of how Toyota manages continuous improvement and human ingenuity, through its improvement kata and coaching kata. The book Toyota Kata consists of four parts, of which three are described in this article: the Improvement Kata (Part 3), the Coaching Kata (part 4) and Objectives for replication (section 5). This book is the best and effective way to learn the ideas behind the continuously improving Toyota organization and production system. It started me on a lot of thinking streaks and opened a lot of threads for how to effectively do my job as a Lean/Agile consultant. This should be the FIRST book for anyone wanting to understand Lean. Toyota Kata is a management book by Mike Rother. This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. by McGraw-Hill Education This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. It started me on a lot of thinking streaks and opened a lot of threads for how to effectively do my job as a Lean/Agile consultant. If you are more interested on HOW to think about continuos improvement than WHAT to think, then stop everything you are doing and start reading this. This book tells you about the system (kata) that helps you identify what your next step needs to be and therefore what problem you should seek to solve. This is essentially what the aviation industry embraced in the 70s and what the healthcare industry is thankfully embracing. My name is Mike Rother. This evolution of the people, not just the processes, that is the key. This book delves into the weeds. I didn't feel entirely comfortable, as I didn't have solid experience with ANY of the tools which are touted to fill up most "Lean" books.
It is conceivable that the point here is not that we do not see the problems in our processes, but rather that we do not want to see them because that would undermine the sense of certainty we have about how our factory is working. Part 4 goes into coaching Kata and how to bring about cultural change. I remember how shocked I was to read his prescription for revitalizing continuous improvement -- i.e. Welcome back. The subject is not new to me and I have practiced both the improvement work and the attached coaching, but I felt it was really time to read the book. It covers, in great detail, what is needed to keep going along the path.Just like any other leadership book that I've read, this one just has a manufacturing theme to it and different terminology.I took a few things from this book, but I believe it is much more useful for manufacturing contexts, which is not my case.

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Learning to Improve: How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations Definitely readable book for Management and process relatStory of Toyota, interviews with Toyota's employees simply intriguing. The Improvement Kata and the Coaching Kata are not new, but they are explained here in a way that makes them an integrated whole and accessible to anyone who will take the time to study this excellent work.

"Toyota Kata" could be the most important book on "lean" since "The Toyota Way". Part 4 goes into coaching Kata and how to bring about cultural change.

Much of the writing and approach to process improvement focuses on the mechanics and not the underlying management philosophy necessary to achieve high performance through continuous improvement.Perhaps the Most Important Book on Lean in the last 10 YearsReviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2010

One can learn the skill but not the art of doing, simple statement which gives Toyota's success. Toyota Kata: Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior ResultsThis shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. Also chapters like how mentors to mentor the mentee is interesting.